Fertility


Hot tubs can be great…relaxing, soothing, and sometimes romantic. If all a man cares about is sex, then a hot tub can be a perfect aphrodisiac and no harm done. But if he’s interested in having sex and fathering children, he’d be wise to go another route and skip the hot tub. How come? Because it turns out that heat and sperm are a bad mix.

Let’s back up a second for some basic anatomy here. Sperm are made in the testicles, which hang from the body in the scrotum. The reason for putting the family jewels in such a relatively precarious position is that the sperm-making Sertoli cells of the testicles don’t work right unless they are cooler than body temperature by a few degrees Fahrenheit. Warm them up for more than a few degrees and for more than a few minutes and sperm production is temporarily shut down.

Normally, the testicles maintain a relatively constant temperature by raising or lowering closer to, or farther from, the body. The scrotum is lined with temperature-sensitive muscles. In warm conditions the muscles relax and let the testicles hang far from the body whereas cold temperatures (particularly cold water) make the scrotum contract, pulling the testicles tight against the body for added warmth.

But soaking in a hot tub makes it impossible for the testicles to remain cool. As relaxing as it may feel, it’s not a happy experience for the testicles. Sperm formation slows or halts, and sperm that have already been made may be harmed, all of which can lower the chances the man can conceive a child.  The same thing, by the way, happens if a guy has a high fever…sperm production will be temporarily interrupted.

This impact on fertility also happens if a man has a high fever, which is why guys going to get a sperm count are told to wait for up to 3 months if they’ve had any kind of cold, flu, or infection.

Bottom line? A hot tub every once in awhile isn’t a big deal, but if you’re having a hard time getting pregnant, avoid romantic interludes in hot water.

By Harry Fisch, MD

Loss of libido effects both men and women and at ilumina Healing Sanctuary we start with the natural approach. Specializing in infertility we often hear about couples struggling during the ovulation stage of the women’s menstrual cycle as sex can become more of a chore than a pleasure. That combined with hormonal changes and a general increase in stress the libido can really suffer. (more…)

It’s not the first time we’ve advised men (and women) who want to become parents that they need to stop smoking immediately, and it won’t be the last. Now another new study adds to the already compelling body of damning evidence showing that smoking harms fertility. (more…)

One question that often arises at ilumina is how often to get acupuncture when going through an IVF cycle. The answer is simple and complex. Here is my general recommendation if you are starting an IVF cycle and the goal is to promote ovarian response, optimize hormones, and increase the quantity and quality of the the uterine lining. Please note that if  pathological hyperstimulation/ OHSS occurs acupuncture is an excellent treatment and can often “save” the cycle. (more…)

ilumina Healing Sanctuary is honored to offer these amazing free events that you do not want to miss.  To register please call ilumina Healing Sanctuary at (602) 957-2602.

(more…)

A healthy diet can help contribute to a healthy conception, but does it matter if the milk you drink or the veggies you eat are organic? Sometimes it does…

There’s no shortage of advice on what you should eat when trying to get pregnant. Much less is known about how food—or more precisely the preservatives, hormones, pesticides, and other toxic chemicals lurking there—could interfere with your ability to conceive. To be on the safe side, some experts think now may be the time to go organic with at least some of the foods you consume. (more…)

Scientists have been learning more about environmental hazards and chemicals that can affect fertility, and now they’ve added another potential threat to the list: polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), used as a flame retardant. (more…)

Next Page »